To the world, whisky can be categorized as a ‘distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash’. But to its drinker, it’s so much more than that.
When whisky lovers say, ‘whisky’, they mean the enriching conversation, the warmth that is consumed when good folks get together, the experience that puts a song in their hearts and laughter on their lips, and the warm glow of contentment in their eyes.
Yes, that is what whisky is made of, to its drinkers:
the
warmth
the
conversation
the
song
and
the fire

 

What is Whisky

Whisky originated from Scotland. It was introduced to the United States by Irish immigrants in 1700s, where it came to be spelled as whiskey. This elegant liquid gold is now produced all over the world.

What is Whiskey made from, and how?

If you’re wondering what is whiskey made from and how it is made, read further.
The basic process of whiskey production follows a strictly regulated standard. Typically, a distilled spirit, whisky is made of fermented grain and matured in oak casks or barrels for a period of time. In the first step, the best quality grains (such like malted barley, rye, corn or wheat) are soaked in water, spread out on malting floors and left to germinate. The mixture, now called green malt is sent to the kiln for drying where it is provided heat at maximum 70 degrees Celsius. Next step is mashing, to extract the sugars, in which the dried malt is ground into a course flour, mixed with hot water in the mash tun (this sugary mixture is called wort) and stirred. After this comes the fermentation in which the wort is allowed to cool down to 20 degrees, and yeast is inserted inside to start the fermentation process. The last step is distillation wherein this fermented mix is distilled twice and then passed through spirit safe and allowed to mature.

Whiskey definition

Whiskey making has evolved over several centuries to become increasingly refined and sophisticated, with a variety of blends and brands adding their own unique tweaks to this liquid sunshine that we so love.
Now the question is, what do you see whisky as?