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Rate your whisky on a scale of 1 to 10!

There are different whiskeys available in the world and their quality, flavor, and price depends on the type of grains, including barley, wheat, rye, corn, buckwheat, etc. Multiple types of whiskeys are produced from different whole grains using pot stills or column stills. The primary process of making whiskey is similar, but you will find that taste and preferences are distinct across the world. The basic process of making whiskey is storing and aging it, which is usually done in cask barrels, which also determines the quality and flavor of the spirit. Whiskey is of two types and aged differently - the rye whiskey is aged for 10 years in a charred white oak cask tastes completely different from a barley whiskey which is aged for 15 years in a wine cask.

Chivas Regal 12 year old scotch is my favorite brand its sweet but not much .Chivas Regal is a blended whisky which contain single malt which comes through nicely. It is very hard to rate any whisky because everyone has it’s personal taste and have different opinion but for me Chivas Regal is my kind of taste. Its perfect blend makes it prefect to any occasion and you won’t get a better 12 year old whisky at this price in fact it better than some of the brands with higher price. So grab your whisky glass, put some ice cube in it, relax and enjoy the taste of whisky.

World's Best Bourbon

John J. Bowman

Single Barrel Bourbon

United States

"Floral note on the nose with underlying citrus. Bolder caramel and fig notes come through at the end. Rich and spicy body with a balanced mouthfeel. Vanilla and toffee sweetens and tones down the spice. Floral notes with lavender, delicate but full. Smooth, candied fruit finish. Sweet and long."

World's Best Wheat

Best American Wheat

Bainbridge

Battle Point

United States

"Plenty of caramel and vanilla on the nose. Sweet and fruity, yet smooth. The palate is very well balanced with tropical fruits, vanilla and a pleasant, warm mouthfeel. Slightly tart and spicy, going into a smooth finish."

World's Best Blended Malt

Best Scotch Blended Malt

Johnnie Walker

Green Label

United Kingdom

"Green tobacco and match sticks, beach pebbles and shells in a plastic bucket, with a clutch of rocket salad. Palate of Oloroso sherry and burnt sugar underlain by a thin winey character.

World's Best Flavoured

Best Canadian Flavoured

J.P. Wiser's

Hopped Whisky

Canada

"The nose is almost akin to a rum or VS Armagnac, edgy and earthy. Masterfully blended with a rich creamy texture. Toasted oak, milk chocolate, vanilla, hints of maple and a little mint. Sweet vanilla and oak. Outstanding. Huge sweet viscous palate. Lovely long, sweet finish."yered bitter, dark, melted chocolate before the tobacco returns." 

World's Best Bourbon

John J. Bowman

Single Barrel Bourbon

United States

"Floral note on the nose with underlying citrus. Bolder caramel and fig notes come through at the end. Rich and spicy body with a balanced mouthfeel. Vanilla and toffee sweetens and tones down the spice. Floral notes with lavender, delicate but full. Smooth, candied fruit finish. Sweet and long."

World's Best Wheat

Best American Wheat

Bainbridge

Battle Point

United States

"Plenty of caramel and vanilla on the nose. Sweet and fruity, yet smooth. The palate is very well balanced with tropical fruits, vanilla and a pleasant, warm mouthfeel. Slightly tart and spicy, going into a smooth finish."

World's Best Blended Malt

Best Scotch Blended Malt

Johnnie Walker

Green Label

United Kingdom

"Green tobacco and match sticks, beach pebbles and shells in a plastic bucket, with a clutch of rocket salad. Palate of Oloroso sherry and burnt sugar underlain by a thin winey character.

World's Best Flavoured

Best Canadian Flavoured

J.P. Wiser's

Hopped Whisky

Canada

"The nose is almost akin to a rum or VS Armagnac, edgy and earthy. Masterfully blended with a rich creamy texture. Toasted oak, milk chocolate, vanilla, hints of maple and a little mint. Sweet vanilla and oak. Outstanding. Huge sweet viscous palate. Lovely long, sweet finish."yered bitter, dark, melted chocolate before the tobacco returns." 

There is no such thing as a 'bad whiskey.' It depends on what you like, how much you want to spend, and where and how you’re drinking it. Only you know the taste you like which you can find within your price range and preferences. In my opinion, single malt whiskey should be given the highest ratings due to the following reasons:
a) The widest range and depth of flavors;
b) The most comprehensive range of individual distillers and thus choices
c) Arguably the richest traditions, although it is produced by Irish whiskey
d) And of course, single malt scotch is the most expensive type of whiskey

No whiskey is bad, only some are made better than others.”

Several good whiskeys are available in India. Those days are gone when you had to pick between JW or CHIVAS. It's a myth that blended whiskeys are inferior, cheaper, and taste worse than single malts. Ratings aside, many people also fail to appreciate the blends from a technical standpoint. I understand that you are partying and you need to know some good brands. This is a tough one as everyone has different tastes. Personally, I don't like Jack Daniels, but people do love it for its wooden taste due to barrels. I would recommend Blenders, Teachers, Antiquity Rare, and Royal Stag but not barrel select.

Whiskies are rated based on some popular competitions. I prefer to follow the ratings given by “International Whiskey Competition” because the competition is exclusively dedicated to whiskies. This competition follows a 100 point rating system and recognizes whiskies across 60 categories. The COO of Le Nez du Vin, Sebastien Gavillet heads the testing panel of IWC. Since 2015, he has rejuvenated IWC’s testing methodology and has turned it into one of the pioneer whiskey tasting competitions in the world. Since 2016, competition IWC started archiving its entry samples so that it can be referenced in the future. Ardbeg Kelpie Committee Exclusivewon the “whiskey of the year” in the 2017 competition. IWC is now receiving entries for the 2018 edition and the deadline for the same is 15thMarch 2018.

In general, however, people tend to go by the idea that the more expensive a spirit is, the higher will be its ratings. This assumption is based on the idea that as the quality of the whiskey is enhances, its price also increases as better quality ingredients are used to produce the whiskey. This assumption, however, may not be true. Whiskey is all about the taste and every individual has their own preferences as far as taste goes.

If you know the process then it’s for you to provide the ratings to any whisky.

Time is the main factor in this case. Whisky becomes better as time passes. But times are not the only parameter who helps to win the race.

Another key factor is its smooth and satiating texture. Good blend earns good ratings.

Finally, individual flavor and aroma is the determinant who leads the rest.

People also rate whisky by the type for Eg .Irish blend, American whisky.

If you are taste specific than few manufacturer also makes signature type whisky.

Price sometimes helps to evaluate whisky as higher the price better the whisky.( but always careful, some people cheat also)

Whisky has got to have the richest history in the developed world. I am pretty sure whisky has been the reason behind more men becoming friends because of it than the brawls that also happen in its name. Different nations are even known for classy whiskies that blend richness and fruit, sometimes flirting with smoke. One thing that remains common in all kinds of whisky with distinct flavours of dark fruit, chocolate, and rich caramel, is that you can still feel the original flavour of whisky for ages after you’ve had a sip. Scientists reveal that diluting whisky can enhance its flavour. Whisky is a currency of respect among men. A bottle of it presented to a fellow says "I acknowledge you as a man and have no plans to stab you." There is much we can learn from a man’s choice of whisky and the way the man treats the drink in his hand. Men grow up, and may even let death happen to them one day, but men shall never get old, for men are preserved in whisky.

 

Whisky is probably the best known of Scotland's local produces, no wonder then that Whisky accounts for the second highest business in the region. Well, my expectations were very low, but in the end, whisky is not all that bad and the graduation from a dilettante to a connoisseur would require some personal experience with Whisky and of course the time that goes along with it.

American whiskey is distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain. It must have the taste, aroma, and other characteristics commonly attributed to whiskey. The best whiskies are accompanied with an age statement which commonly guarantees the age of whisky. Whiskies often turn cloudy when stored at cool temperatures or when cold water is added to them, and this is perfectly normal. Whisky is the most highly rated product around the globe and once you try it and then try it some more, you would understand why the over thousand-year old drink manages to make all that fuss. The name whisky literally translates to ‘Water of Life’.

The first thing to know as a whisky drinker is that the whisky ratings by the experts are not meant to universally affect the choices made by anyone. Your favourite whisky appeals to you because your tongue and palate like it better than some of the most famous whiskies in the world. It’s ultimately about what you like.

With that in the background, ratings can help you make an educated guess when you are learning to develop a taste in the finer whiskies of the world. Many experts use a 100 point rating system which is scored keeping in mind the different segments being reviewed. Standardly, a reviewer checks from these segments - Nose, palate, balance, body, and feel (BBF) and finish.

Whiskies belong to different categories such as Single malts, Blended, Scotch, Bourbon, Irish, and Tennessee and so on and so forth. While rating a whisky, reviewers standardly compare it with the scores of others in the same whisky.

Scores above 95 are legendary, and anything below 59 is horrific.

Over the years I have tried a number of brands! While Jack Daniel’s Old No. 7 is definitely the
best for me in the lot, sadly it is nowhere near to being called affordable in the country.
I also prefer Antiquity Blue. This whisky has a very unique taste to it. If you have had the chance
to taste quite a few whiskies in your life, you’ll know what I mean. The choicest components
used in making this bottle give it a smooth full flavor.
The third choice I will go for is the recently rebranded 8PM, which falls in the ‘affordable with a
premium taste’ category. 8PM, is an Indian made whisky, and works best with good seafood
dishes including my favorite spiced prawns, crab, mussels, fried fishes as well as some roasted
chicken.

DIFFERNT WHISKIES-WHAT MAKES THEM DIFFERENT

As per Wikipedia, Whisky or whiskey is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Various grains (which may be malted) are used for different varieties, including barley, corn (maize), rye, and wheat. Whisky is typically aged in wooden casks, generally made of charred white oak.

The typical unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation, and aging in wooden barrels.

And this is what makes different whiskies stand out from others. There are many types of whiskies and whiskeys like Scotch, Irish, Single Malt, blends of Bourbon and rye. You also have what you call a Blended Whisky, which contains mixture of different whiskies (malt, grain), or whiskies from different distilleries, etc.

Ratings of whiskies are to do with how well the whisky ranks in terms of strength, taste,
colour, aroma and so on and so forth. Most people around the world buy a whiskey based on
word of mouth because ultimately it’s you who has to decide whether your palate agrees
with the whisky or no.
Also, some whiskies might not always fare well as the others, and thus the rankings can be
affected to suit standards, but these whiskies are the top choice in their lands. For example,
Rye whiskey is crazy famous in Canada but you cannot compare it with Scotch, and thus
there are different categories. If you are to tell which is best, you can’t because they have
different tastes altogether.
Most rating systems, for example, score from 1-100 and anything above 95 is brilliant while
anything below 59 is trash.

Whiskey comes from the original Gaelic word meaning the “Water of Life.” This timeless, classic drink has a rich and fascinating history, unparalleled by any other drink. With a wide variety of choices to suit every taste and occasion, such as scotch, bourbon, rye, single malt, etc., the number of variations of whiskey is matched only by the respect it commands from true connoisseurs. Whiskeys can be primarily categorized into the following based on the ingredients from which they are distilled:

Bourbon, the quintessential American whiskey originally from the state of Kentucky, is brewed from corn and aged in new, charred oak barrels, is now manufactured worldwide.

Scotch, from Scotland, is made from a combination of water, yeast, malted barley aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Rye, which is distilled from its namesake, was quite famous during the American Revolution. It has since survived a push in to near oblivion post-Prohibition and is now making a comeback once again.

Here’s a glimpse into some of the most popular whiskeys in the world:​

Whiskey comes from the original Gaelic word meaning the “Water of Life.” This timeless, classic drink has a rich and fascinating history, unparalleled by any other drink. With a wide variety of choices to suit every taste and occasion, such as scotch, bourbon, rye, single malt, etc., the number of variations of whiskey is matched only by the respect it commands from true connoisseurs. Whiskeys can be primarily categorized into the following based on the ingredients from which they are distilled:
Bourbon, the quintessential American whiskey originally from the state of Kentucky, is brewed from corn and aged in new, charred oak barrels, is now manufactured worldwide.
Scotch, from Scotland, is made from a combination of water, yeast, malted barley aged in oak barrels for at least three years.
Rye, which is distilled from its namesake, was quite famous during the American Revolution. It has since survived a push in to near oblivion post-Prohibition and is now making a comeback once again.
Here’s a glimpse into some of the most popular whiskeys in the world:
• Bushmills Black Bush Whiskey: Known for its aroma of dried fruits and spices so reminiscent of Christmas, this drink is a year-round favorite.
• Elijah Craig 21-year old Single Malt: A limited edition released every year by Heavenly Hill, it is aged for 20 years to make it a truly appealing drink.
• Macallan Rare Cask: The royal whiskey from Scotland is a smooth and spicy drink positioned uniquely based on its taste rather than age.
• Highland Park 18-year old: Arguably the best single malt in the world. Period.
• Glendronach 18: Any list of the best whiskeys would be incomplete without this Scotch whiskey.

As far as whisky ratings are concerned, it is really hard to be a fair judge in this situation. I honestly do not believe that officially one whisky can be better than the other.

Appreciating whisky is no less than appreciating art. Everyone has their own way of interpreting it. It is very subjective and you really can’t put the blame on someone for judging down one brand as compared to the other.

Anyway, I do agree that numbers don’t lie. If a whisky is popular, it is either because it has a comfortable price tag, or it is genuinely well made! The combination of these two is more than likely as well.

So, here we go, this is how I rate my choice of whiskeys,
Jack Daniel’s
Jim Beam
The Famous Grouse
Lagavulin 16
Paul John
Amrut
Bulleit Rye
Lot 40 rye
Jameson
Black Velvet
Crown Royal
Black Nikka
Seagram’s 7 Crown

So Jack is the classic Tennessee. It is sweet. It is simple. Notes include maple and chocolate with perhaps some caramel, none of which are particularly strong. Despite being on the bourbon side, Jack and Evan (white label) taste very similar to me. Jack is perhaps a bit sweeter and may have a slight bit more flavor, but for the price Evan wins in my book. It also gives nice smooth woody nose. The whisky starts rough with hints of wood and hints of smooth vanilla. A bit too rough and one-dimensional. Not much depth, fast disappearing aftertaste.Nonetheless, I have no problem sipping on Jack and it mixes quite well. 

Chewy, robust, and a bit old-fashioned in just the right way, Craigellachie is a meaty malt that leaves a strong impression. Enjoy bold fruit flavors and a “lift of (good) sulfur”—a welcome bit of character imparted by the distillery’s use of worm tub condensers.

Whisky is probably the best known of Scotland's manufactured products. Well, my expectations were very
low, but in the end, it is not all that bad. American whiskey is distilled from a fermented mash of cereal
grain. It must have the taste, aroma, and other characteristics commonly attributed to whiskey. The best
one is a whisky with an age statement is known as guaranteed age whisky. Whiskies often turn cloudy
when stored at cool temperatures or when cool water is added to them, and this is perfectly normal.
Finally, I can only say that it most rated product around the globe.

The first thing to know as a whisky drinker is that the whisky ratings by the experts are not meant to universally affect the choices made by anyone. Your favourite whisky appeals to you because your tongue and palate like it better than some of the most famous whiskies in the world. It’s ultimately about what you like.

With that in the background, ratings can help you make an educated guess when you are learning to develop a taste in the finer whiskies of the world. Many experts use a 100 point rating system which is scored keeping in mind the different segments being reviewed. Standardly, a reviewer checks from these segments - Nose, palate, balance, body, and feel (BBF) and finish.

Whiskies belong to different categories such as Single malts, Blended, Scotch, Bourbon, Irish, and Tennessee and so on and so forth. While rating a whisky, reviewers standardly compare it with the scores of others in the same whisky.

Scores above 95 are legendary, and anything below 59 is horrific.

 

Now if you are a whisky lover, this may not necessarily mean, you are a whisky specialist.

Whisky ratings are the scores given by whisky tasters based on a number of things that

define the character of the scotch or the blended scotch or something else that people want

to call whisky still.

These ratings are hogwash because you need to decide which whisky you like based on

your palate and not because some guy told you that one whisky was superior to the other

based on some scoring method devised by some guy somewhere.

With that in the background, That said, whisky ratings do come in handy when comparing a

new launch with the other whiskies in its category that it is competing against. The score set

by whisky specialists sets a standard to mark the competition up or down.

Most scoring patterns use a 100 point score where anything above 95 is legendary, and

anything lower than 59 is unfit for consumption and should not be called whisky.

To make it short: Rating a whisky means giving it a score that indicates how well you like it.

You can use 1 to 5 stars or a certain range of points or whatever. In the whisky world, a 100

point system is predominant which was adopted from wine rating by Michael Jackson. As

most of the people who rate whisky use this system, it should be an obvious choice for

novices to apply it as well.

The easiest way to rate a whisky would be to drink a dram and just give a score to it. If you

do the ratings just for yourself, this might be sufficient. Tastes, however, are different, you

might like peaty whisky, your reader might prefer sherry monsters. Now a peated whisky

that you scored let’s say 90 points might be unacceptable for that person. Same way, most

people may tell you to have single malts, whereas many others would compel you for

blended whiskies because of enhanced flavours.

 

 

To make it short: Rating a whisky means giving it a score that indicates how well you like it.

You can use 1 to 5 stars or a certain range of points or whatever. In the whisky world, a 100

point system is predominant which was adopted from wine rating by Michael Jackson. As

most of the people who rate whisky use this system, it should be an obvious choice for

novices to apply it as well.

The easiest way to rate a whisky would be to drink a dram and just give a score to it. If you

do the ratings just for yourself, this might be sufficient. Tastes, however, are different, you

might like peaty whisky, your reader might prefer sherry monsters. Now a peated whisky

that you scored let’s say 90 points might be unacceptable for that person. Same way, most

people may tell you to have single malts, whereas many others would compel you for

blended whiskies because of enhanced flavours.

The first thing to care about when it comes to whiskey ratings is that you need to allow your
palate to choose what it likes best instead of relying on someone else’s whisky rating. This is
important as there are so many varieties of whisky due to geographical reasons and other
processes followed that you might like bourbons better than scotch. Essentially, ratings
reflect the personal views of a person. After all, who can say which one is better?
Coming to ratings now, it is not as if ratings are all hogwash because they are not. They help
the reviewer to compare the quality of whisky based on their own experience of whiskies
they’ve already known before.
Also, a traditional scoring system for whiskies comes in handy because, it is very difficult to
write a review that dissects their each and every aspect and then giving a score of, say 87.
Numbered ratings help since they make life easier and a person has to check just the
numbers for each of the whisky’s aspect.
The more common rating system uses a score of 100 where anything 95 or above is truly
fine whisky, and you can store it for your special occasions and those below 59 well go
straight to the trashbin.

Whiskey comes from the original Gaelic word meaning the “Water of Life.” This

timeless, classic drink has a rich and fascinating history, unparalleled by any other

drink. With a wide variety of choices to suit every taste and occasion, such as scotch,

bourbon, rye, single malt, etc., the number of variations of whiskey is matched only

by the respect it commands from true connoisseurs. Whiskeys can be primarily

categorized into the following based on the ingredients from which they are

distilled:

Bourbon, the quintessential American whiskey originally from the state of Kentucky,

is brewed from corn and aged in new, charred oak barrels, is now manufactured

worldwide.

Scotch, from Scotland, is made from a combination of water, yeast, malted barley

aged in oak barrels for at least three years.

Rye, which is distilled from its namesake, was quite famous during the American

Revolution. It has since survived a push in to near oblivion post-Prohibition and is

now making a comeback once again.

Here’s a glimpse into some of the most popular whiskeys in the world:

• Bushmills Black Bush Whiskey: Known for its aroma of dried fruits and spices so

reminiscent of Christmas, this drink is a year-round favorite.

• Elijah Craig 21-year old Single Malt: A limited edition released every year by

Heavenly Hill, it is aged for 20 years to make it a truly appealing drink.

• Macallan Rare Cask: The royal whiskey from Scotland is a smooth and spicy drink

positioned uniquely based on its taste rather than age.

• Highland Park 18-year old: Arguably the best single malt in the world. Period.

• Glendronach 18: Any list of the best whiskeys would be incomplete without this

Scotch whiskey.

The first thing to know as a whisky drinker is that the whisky ratings by the experts are not

meant to universally affect the choices made by anyone. Your favourite whisky appeals to

you because your tongue and palate like it better than some of the most famous whiskies in

the world. It’s ultimately about what you like.

With that in the background, ratings can help you make an educated guess when you are

learning to develop a taste in the finer whiskies of the world. Many experts use a 100 point

rating system which is scored keeping in mind the different segments being reviewed.

Standardly, a reviewer checks from these segments - Nose, palate, balance, body, and feel

(BBF) and finish.

Whiskies belong to different categories such as Single malts, Blended, Scotch, Bourbon,

Irish, and Tennessee and so on and so forth. While rating a whisky, reviewers standardly

compare it with the scores of others in the same whisky.

Scores above 95 are legendary, and anything below 59 is horrific.

As far as whisky ratings are concerned, it is really hard to be a fair

judge in this situation. I honestly do not believe that officially one

whisky can be better than the other.

Appreciating whisky is no less than appreciating art. Everyone has

their own way of interpreting it. It is very subjective and you really

can’t put the blame on someone for judging down one brand as

compared to the other.

Anyway, I do agree that numbers don’t lie. If a whisky is popular, it

is either because it has a comfortable price tag, or it is genuinely

well made! The combination of these two is more than likely as

well.

So, here we go, this is how I rate my choice of whiskeys,

Jack Daniel’s

Jim Beam

The Famous Grouse

Lagavulin 16

Paul John

Amrut

Bulleit Rye

Lot 40 rye

Jameson

Black Velvet

Crown Royal

Black Nikka

Seagram’s 7 Crown