As opposed to the smoky overtones of majority scotches, Irish whiskey has a smoother finish as peat is rarely used while malting.

I still remember the days when I started drinking alcohol. And unlike most of my friends, I did not start from beer. My first drink was whisky! Yes, I was the daring one indeed.

To be honest, I did not like it at all, and threw it all out too (not ashamed to admit), as soon as I came out from the place where I had that drink. The taste of that whisky was so smoky and unlikeable that I wondered what made people drink it so much, and what was so special and classy about whisky  or scotch for that matter.

I held this notion for a long time, till a friend brought a bottle of whisky with him that was made in Ireland. No no… no… he did not go to Ireland (he so wishes to though), but got it from the duty-free shop(s) at the Airport. Being a whisky lover that he is he literally forced me having few pegs with him… and man.. the experience was surreal.

I mean, the taste was smooth, I by all means, had no hangover the next morning and even while drinking, it felt, as if, some liquid heaven is being poured down my throat. Now, I am not saying this to make you feel jealous, but yes, it was that good!

I tried to find out what made this whisky so smooth and nice, and during my research I found it on the internet that Irish whisky is made smoother because they use Peat during malting, which is rarely the case.

What does Peat do?

Barley grain, or damp malt, is exposed to the smoke of a peat fire in order to arrest germination; a crucial part of Whisky production. Peat smoke produces chemicals called phenols and these are absorbed by malted barley which enhances the flavour of the whisky.

Believe it when I say, if you haven’t had Irish whisky yet, it is time you got yourself some.

It is a known fact that the Irish were the first distillers in the British Isles and, for ever since the 19th century, Irish whisky has reigned supreme not only to its scottish rival(s), but to most of the brands from across the globe. 

I still remember the days when I started drinking alcohol. And unlike most of my friends, I did not start from beer. My first drink was whisky! Yes, I was the daring one indeed.

To be honest, I did not like it at all, and threw it all out too (not ashamed to admit), as soon as I came out from the place where I had that drink. The taste of that whisky was so smoky and unlikeable that I wondered what made people drink it so much, and what was so special and classy about whisky  or scotch for that matter.

I held this notion for a long time, till a friend brought a bottle of whisky with him that was made in Ireland. No no… no… he did not go to Ireland (he so wishes to though), but got it from the duty-free shop(s) at the Airport. Being a whisky lover that he is he literally forced me having few pegs with him… and man.. the experience was surreal.

I mean, the taste was smooth, I by all means, had no hangover the next morning and even while drinking, it felt, as if, some liquid heaven is being poured down my throat. Now, I am not saying this to make you feel jealous, but yes, it was that good!

I tried to find out what made this whisky so smooth and nice, and during my research I found it on the internet that Irish whisky is made smoother because they use Peat during malting, which is rarely the case.

What does Peat do?

Barley grain, or damp malt, is exposed to the smoke of a peat fire in order to arrest germination; a crucial part of Whisky production. Peat smoke produces chemicals called phenols and these are absorbed by malted barley which enhances the flavour of the whisky.

Believe it when I say, if you haven’t had Irish whisky yet, it is time you got yourself some.

Irish whisky provides various choices to consumers. For example, there's single malt Irish whisky, which is produced using only malted barley. The whisky is produced in pot stills and all processes are carried out in the same distillery. Another type of Irish whisky is single pot still whisky, which is produced using a combination of malted and un-malted barley. It has the same distillation process as single malt Irish whiskey. Grain whiskey is another type of Irish whisky, which is produced through a continuous distillation process in a column or Coffey still. Various grains can be used to produce this type of Irish whisky. The most popular nowadays is the blended whisky, which is a combination of all other types of Irish whisky.

Irish whisky provides various choices to consumers. For example, there's single malt Irish whisky, which is produced using only malted barley. The whisky is produced in pot stills and all processes are carried out in the same distillery. Another type of Irish whisky is single pot still whisky, which is produced using a combination of malted and un-malted barley. It has the same distillation process as single malt Irish whiskey. Grain whiskey is another type of Irish whisky, which is produced through a continuous distillation process in a column or Coffey still. Various grains can be used to produce this type of Irish whisky. The most popular nowadays is the blended whisky, which is a combination of all other types of Irish whisky.

Irish Whiskey has a different blend, different rare taste. 

Malt is different than traditional whiskey. Everyone should try it once, different tastes are great to enjoy remarkable times with family & friends.

Enjoy the smokey taste, rare combination & smooth feel.

Experience is everything when crafting taste for Audience & its all about making a great choice while selecting whiskey.

Irish Whiskey has a different blend, different rare taste. 

Malt is different than traditional whiskey. Everyone should try it once, different tastes are great to enjoy remarkable times with family & friends.

Enjoy the smokey taste, rare combination & smooth feel.

Experience is everything when crafting taste for Audience & its all about making the great choice while selecting whiskey.

Irish whiskey can be the strongest whiskey as it contains alcohol up to 95%. It comes in different colors which can vary from pale gold to dark amber. It comes in four variants - Pot still, malt, wheat, and blended. Green Spot, Teeling, Glendalough, Jameson, Paddy, and Redbreast are some popular Irish whiskey brands. No, no, it doesn’t make you do chicken dance or something, but Irish chicken dance is worth trying after having Irish whiskey. I sometimes think what if these Irish whiskeys are made while doing the chicken dance?

Irish whiskey can be the strongest whiskey as it contains alcohol up to 95%. It comes in different colors which can vary from pale gold to dark amber. It comes in four variants - Pot still, malt, wheat, and blended. Green Spot, Teeling, Glendalough, Jameson, Paddy, and Redbreast are some popular Irish whiskey brands. No, no, it doesn’t make you do chicken dance or something, but Irish chicken dance is worth trying after having Irish whiskey. I sometimes think what if these Irish whiskeys are made while doing the chicken dance?

Irish whiskey has been one of the most popular spirits in the world until the late 19th century. In
most of the Irish whiskeys, peat is rarely used during the malting process which gives it a
smoother finish as compared to other whiskeys. Irish whiskey has different types, which depend
on the kind of grain used in the distillation process. Irish whiskey was traditionally produced in pot
stills. The various types included Single Malt Irish Whiskey, Single Pot Still Whiskey, Grain
Whiskey, and Blended whiskey. Ireland now has about sixteen distilleries in operation and much
more in planning stages. The exports of Irish whiskeys are growing year by year.

I honestly do not want to sound like a stereotyping ignorant, but isn’t there a very popular Irish toast that goes like, “God invented whiskey so the Irish wouldn’t rule the world,” or the much more popular saying, “drink like an Irishman!”

 

Can’t blame them though! The Irish have always had a penchant for whiskey probably owing to the fact that they were one of the very first distillers of the golden liquid in Europe. Apart from the fact that the word “Whiskey” comes from the Irish “uisce”, the classic water of life from Ireland is no less than its closest cousin, Scotch whisky.

 

Anyway, with whiskey aficionados everywhere giving Irish whisky its moments, a personal take on the best of Irish-made available in the market is called for.

 

My personal favorite undoubtedly has to be Jameson, also the universally favorite Irish whiskey. This blend of pot still and grain whiskey is gorgeously smooth and intensely flavorful at the same time.

 

Second is the Bushmills  Single malt closely followed by Tullamore Dew. I prefer the sweetness of honey of the former over the latter’s mixed fruity-sweet-spicy burst of flavor in my mouth any day.

 

Besides these 3, you should definitely try the Kilbeggan 15YO and Powers gold label as well.

 

Irish whiskeys are known to be smooth, fruity, and triple distilled and many of them are, but this isn't the full story. The Irish are widely credited as being the first to distil whiskey, though this is strictly contested by the Scots. The Bushmills distillery, for example, is the world’s oldest licensed distillery, founded in 1608. The Irish are unique in their pure pot still whiskey.

 

Irish single pot still whiskey is a mix of barley, malted and otherwise, distilled in a pot still. The unmalted barley proffers a spicy freshness that one associates with Irish whiskey. Some of the Irish blends are global successes with Bushmills Original and Jameson both being notable examples. There's also a healthy selection of single malt expressions, including the majority of the Bushmills range, Tyrconnell and Connemara.

 

In the last 20 or so years we've seen the re-introduction of double distilled single malts and pleated malts, as well as a reinvigorated and now thriving single pot still Irish whiskey style. There are also many new distilleries being constructed as Irish whiskey continues to be the fastest growing spirits category in the world!

 

Irish Whiskey simply has to exist! I mean, the very word ‘whiskey,’ comes from

the Irish Gaelic ‘uisce betha,’ that wonderfully translates to ‘water of life!’

Although out of the limelight for a while, this gem has made a comeback into

the hearts of many whisky aficionados the world over in the recent past.

My best friend always calls for any celebration with an added motivation of a

bottle of Irish Whiskey! The Irish-made whiskey is definitely cut above the rest

in the market. It wouldn’t take you many glasses to realize that the Irish malt is

any day smoother than those of its other worthy competitors.

Let us begin with the names of some famous brands of Irish whisky type before we get down to why Irish whisky gets its own unique name. For the uninitiated, the flavours, strength and colours of different whiskies from around the world depend on the ingredients used and the variations in the aging process.

 

Famous Brands of Irish Whiskey

Powers John's Lane

Green Spot

Jameson Original

Bushmills Original

Bushmills Black Bush

Powers Gold Label

Bushmills 10-Year Single Malt

Knappogue 12-Year

The shine of Irish whiskey more often than not gets clouded by its more famous cousin, the Scotch. The Irish Single malts, for instance, do not use Peat and thus these whiskies do not have a prominent peaty nature. On the other hand not using peat actually makes Irish whiskies smoother compared to the smoky Scotch. It is a well known fact that Irish whiskies used to lead the whisky niche across the world and it was only after the exceedingly long decline in the 19th century that the Irish distilleries went out of business.

Off late the demand for Irish whiskies has picked up and has been the fastest growing whisky industry since the 1990s.

Irish whiskies commonly use malted barley. The traditional Irish whiskey is produced in pot stills and was either made as Single Malt Irish whiskey with malted barley or Single pot still whiskey. The Grain Irish whiskey came in much later with the introduction of the continuous distillation process.

Irish whiskey has sadly been thought of as a cheap shot to go along with cheap beer. But this mentality no longer applies. As the public becomes more and more infatuated with all things related to brown spirits, Irish whiskey has readily kept pace with bourbon, rye, and scotch. Irish whiskey has seen a great resurgence in popularity since the late twentieth century, and has been the fastest growing spirit in the world every year since 1990. Irish whiskey is made with a blend of malted and un-malted barley in the pot still phase. In other words it is made from kiln-dried barley.

As its name suggests, it has its origin in Ireland. During the 18th century, Irish whiskey had a prominent place in the spirits market across the globe, but it slowly deteriorated from the start of the 19th century. It has begun regaining grounds in the last two decades. In fact, they are the fastest-growing spirits in the world. They are peculiar when it comes to pure pot still whiskey. They are smoother than their primary rivals, the scotch, which has a smoky or earthy undertone. Some of the Irish Whiskeys worth trying are Bushmills Red Bush, Tullamore Dew 12-Year Special Reserve, Green Spot Single-Pot Still, and Jameson Gold Reserve.

How to make your coffee Irish and the common Irish Joke is, add some whiskey to it. Whisky and its

character around the world varies because of the ingredients, ageing and filtration process and

whisky from Ireland or the Irish whisky has its own personality for the same reason.

Peat is rarely ever used in the malting process used to make Irish whiskey, and that gives Irish whisky

a smoother finish when compared to the smoky, earthy overtones common to some Scotches. At one

point in time, Irish whisky was the most popular in the world but late 19th century saw a constant and

long decline which eventually damaged their industry.

The word 'whiskey' (or whisky) actually comes from the Irish (or 'Gaelic') uisce beatha, meaning water

of life. Unlike today, however, whiskey wasn’t aged and thus did not have its characteristic colour and

taste.

Irish whiskey comes in several forms, depending on the type of grain used and the distillation

process. Traditionally, Irish whiskey was produced in pot stills and was either made as Single Malt

Irish whiskey with malted barley or Single pot still whiskey. Later a new form of distillation process

called continuous distillation gave rise to what is called Grain whiskey.

Assuming it's good whiskey, you serve it like any other decent whiskey; in a glass, with a dash of water if desired, no ice.

If it’s just standard-issue Jameson or something, have it any way you want. Mixed with coke would be popular, or I’ve had good results on occasion with bitter lemon or ginger ale.

I like Irish whiskey mostly due to its flavour. It comes with a rather light feel that tastes

absolutely fine on my palate, I usually prefer having a glass after dinner. Personally, I

feel that nothing compliments a grand party or celebration quite like a bottle of fine Irish

whiskey. It not only sets your mood, but quenches your thirst as well. Furthermore, Irish

whiskey is pretty popular across the world as people enjoy its smooth, fruity and light

taste. You can also mix it with other liquor if you want to experience something new.

There are a variety of options for Irish whiskey lovers to choose from as well.

As its name suggests, it has its origin in Ireland. During the 18th century, Irish whiskey

had a prominent place in the spirits market across the globe, but it slowly deteriorated from the start of the

19th century. It has begun regaining grounds in the last two decades. In fact, they are the fastest-growing

spirits in the world. They are peculiar when it comes to pure pot still whiskey. They are smoother than

their primary rivals, the scotch, which has a smoky or earthy undertone. Some of the Irish Whiskeys worth

trying are Bushmills Red Bush, Tullamore Dew 12-Year Special Reserve, Green Spot Single-Pot Still, and

Jameson Gold Reserve.

Whiskey, across the world, stands for unadulterated satisfaction. Although the Irish Whiskey is

very much similar to Scotch whiskey in many ways, the traditional Irish whiskey is distilled from a

mash of mixed malted and unmalted grains. The Scotch, however, is either distilled exclusively

from malted grain (hence "single malt") or from unmalted grain (which is then mixed with malt

whiskey to create "blended whiskey"). Today, most Irish whiskey is blended from a mixture of pot

still whiskey and cheaper grain whiskey. Bushmills, however, is an exception in that it produces

no Irish-style pot-still whiskey. Currently, the distilleries operating in Ireland are:

New Midleton Distillery (Jameson, Powers, Paddy, Middleton, Redbreast, and others)

-Old Bushmills Distillery (all Old Bushmills, Black Bush, 1608)

-Bushmills 10-, 12- and 16- and 21-year- old single malts)

-Cooley Distillery (Connemara, Knappogue, Michael Collins, Tyrconnell, and others).

With love from Ireland, I truly love Irish whiskey as it has a different kind of taste.

Smokey is one of the most favorite whiskeys across the globe.

It’s my first choice and first love when it comes to selecting whiskey for special occasions. I love the way it

goes down my throat and illuminates my spirit from within leading to some great moments afterward