Whisky distilled in India are typically blends of malt whisky, barley, fermented molasses, and neutral spirits. Notes of sweet caramel, tempered with a sharp touch of spice, are ubiquitous characteristics.

Indian Whisky came from Scotch Whisky as per the historical data and later when it started manufacturing in India. Country like India tops the chart when it comes to consuming Indian Whisky. 

Maximum % of whisky is molasses-based that are consumed in India and mostly it is prepared using cereals.

Indian Whisky came from Scotch Whisky as per the historical data and later when it started manufacturing in India. The country like India tops the chart when it comes to consuming Indian Whisky. 

Maximum % of whisky is molasses-based that are consumed in India and mostly it is prepared using cereals.

As is the case with most of the automobiles "Engineered in Germany, made in India", same is the case with Indian Scotch Whisky as it uses the same techniques of making whiskies that are used in the western world, and make them in India.

As is the case with most of the automobiles "Engineered in Germany, made in India", same is the case with Indian Scotch Whisky as it uses the same techniques of making whiskies that are used in the western world, and make them in India.

Because it is obtained from molasses, Indian whisky is often (in fun), referred as 'carmalised firewater'. The taste of which is further refined by blending it with a single malt true scotch whisky, the sole purpose of which is to lend it a sleek texture and a taste that leaves people craving for more.

Indians were introduced to scotch or whiskey during the British rule. They established a brewery as well around the country. After that, a lot of breweries opened up in India. Now the condition is such that India has become the biggest consumer of whiskey in the world. In 2010, India consumed nearly half of the global whiskey production. Whiskeys produced here are in different prices according to the affordability of the consumer. Officer’s Choice, Imperial Blue, Bagpiper, Blenders Pride, Royal Stag, Signature, Director’s Special, 8 PM, After Dark are some popular brands of whiskeys produced and consumed here

In the 19th Century during the British Raj the drinking of Scotch whiskey started. Edward Dyer in the late 1820’s, came to India to set up the first brewery in India at “Kasauli” which was later shifted to “Solan” and became the first Indian distillery. The first Indian whiskey produced by India was “Amrut” by Amrut Distilleries which was launched on 24th August 2004. The whiskies produced in India are mostly distilled from fermented molasses. Some of the top Indian Whiskey brands are Director’s Special, 8 PM, Hayward’s Fine, Imperial Blue, Original Choice, Bagpiper, Royal Stag, Mc Dowell’s No.1 and my favourite Antiquity Blue.

Yeah well, surprise surprise, who knew Indians could distill world-class whiskies? Certainly not Indians! But, as the truth stands, India definitely produces whiskies that the world loves to drink.

 

Most Indian whiskies are made by blending spirit distilled from fermented molasses with either pre-blended Scotch whisky or grain whisky (maize, wheat, rye or barley). This unique process of production also means that it has to be marketed in Europe as ‘spirit drink’ rather than as whisky.

 

Besides the widely popular Imperial Blue, McDowell’s no.1, Old Tavern, 8pm and Haywards, there are two big Indian whisky brands that you need to take notice of right now, and they are Paul John and Amrut.

 

The Indian Single Malt Select Cask Peated from the house of John Paul also happens to be a World Whiskies award holder!

 

Indian whiskies are not cheap supplements to their global counterparts as the popular notion holds! I would strongly suggest Amrut Fusion and Paul John Brilliance to the non-believers out there!

 

 

Every country around the world has at least one national dish but what about a national drink? Whether they’re blended and served with a tiny umbrella, muddled with fresh fruit, or made with only two ingredients, these cocktails are as unique to their home countries as any national dish. Here is the list of top five cocktails around the globe.

#1. Black Russian

#2. Pisco Sour

#3. The Singapore Sling

#4. Martini

#5. Pimm’s Cup

Now it becomes almost impossible for one to travel to different countries to have their one special drink but thanks to numerous food and beverages apps floating around, one can basically check the ratings and try from among these cocktails to get an idea on what these cocktails really are all about. Start with a Martini, standard James Bond style. You can follow that up with either Black Russian or the Pimm’s cup and if you have managed to have both in one evening, I would suggest to try the remaining on a different day.

What is Whisky Rating?

To make it short: Rating a whisky means giving it a score that indicates how well you like it. You can use 1 to 5 stars or a certain range of points or whatever. In the whisky world, a 100 point system is predominant which was adopted from wine rating by Michael Jackson. As most of the people who rate whisky use this system, it should be an obvious choice for novices to apply it as well.

 

The easiest way to rate a whisky would be to drink a dram and just give a score to it. If you do the ratings just for yourself, this might be sufficient. But as soon as you publish your rating in any way, be it on a website like this one, in a forum or just by telling it to a friend, you will run into problems. Tastes are different, you might like peaty whisky, your reader might prefer sherry monsters. Now a peated whisky that you scored let’s say 90 points might be unacceptable for that person.

Indian whiskies are fruity and malty and the reason behind that is molasses. Distilleries across India use molasses as the material to produce whisky. Indian whiskies are often examples of youthful exuberance, enjoyable and of a defined style in their own right. Plenty of tropical fruit and toffee, of late there have been a few peaty offerings too. India’s climate proffers a speedy maturation. The temperature is such that the angel’s share accounts for a loss of around twelve percent alcohol by volume per annum. Thus, Indian whiskies tend to be much younger than their Gaelic counterparts. 

However, Indian whiskies do not qualify for whisky in European and American Markets. Some accuse it of not being whisky at all, with much produced from molasses rather than grain or malted barley, but despite the technicality it is one of the largest spirit categories in the world

The first traditional single malt distillery was Amrut, established in 1948 in Bangalore. Forty years later McDowell’s distillery in Goa began malt whisky production.

  1. Almost all the whiskey produced in India is made by blending spirit distilled from fermented molasses (similar to what we know as rum) with either grain whisky (maize, wheat, rye or barley) or pre-blended Scotch whisky, it cannot be sold in Europe as whisky.

 

India is an ostensibly a huge whisky-drinking nation - the biggest of them all if you look at the bare consumption figures – but nearly all the domestic ‘whisky’ produced here is dominated by molasses-derived spirit which does not pass for Whisky in either Europe or in The Americas.

 

Indian whiskey sold outside the EU is usually made mainly of molasses like RUM. But there are honorable exceptions – most famous Amrut, launched not in India but in Glasgow In 2004. Amrut produced India’s first ever single malt whiskey.

 

Contrary to popular thought, the biggest consumers of liquor are not Punjabis but the people from God’s own country, Kerala. Punjab’s consumption of liquor ranks second after Kerala because the volume by numbers is actually higher.

The Indian whisky market is surprisingly big! Thanks to the high number of

whisky enthusiasts out here, we do have some very good brands out there

that are totally homemade and absolutely delicious! Whiskey in India is made

from molasses, which gives it a distinctive taste and differentiates it from

imported whiskey. I do prefer it at times when there is some sort of a

celebration on a large scale. Consuming it in parties is pretty common for me.

Why don’t you pick a bottle from any of these as well?

Royal Stag

Imperial Blue

Haywards Fine

Officer’s Choice

McDowell’s No. 1 Reserve

8PM

Director’s Special

To start with, Indian whisky does not qualify for whisky in European nations and in the US and there are two reasons for this. Indian whisky is fermented out of molasses as against grains and that there is absolutely no aging process involved in Indian whisky making it extremely cheap.

 

It is still surprising then that India is one of the largest producers of whisky in the world. Most of the expensive liquor sold in India is called Indian Made Foreign liquor and is basically the blended version of whisky where 10-12% of fancy brands from Europe or US are used.

 

It is important to know that whisky was brought to India by the Britishers and the first plant was set for beer in Himachal Pradesh. Earlier, it was a brewery in Kasauli considering the wide availability of fresh water. The Kasauli brewery was later converted into a distillery which used molasses for fermentation. The reason why grains weren’t used is quite the simple one - there were no grains because of a shortage of food in the British India.

Most distilled spirits that are labeled, as "whisky" in India is a form of Indian-made foreign liquor, most commonly blends based on neutral spirits that are distilled from fermented molasses with only a small portion consisting of the traditional malt whisky, usually about 10 to 12 percent.

Outside India, such a drink would more likely be labelled rum. India is ostensibly a huge whisky-drinking nation – the biggest of them all if you look at the bare consumption figures – but nearly all the domestic ‘whisky’ produced here is dominated by molasses-derived spirit (and therefore, according to EU legislation, not whisky at all).

Indians are not traditionally whiskey drinkers. Whiskey was introduced to Indians by the Britishers in the 19th century. Unlike the whiskeys around the world, Indian whiskey is usually made from molasses, which sadly according to EU legislation, is not considered as a whiskey at all. The Indian tropical climate enhances and speeds up the maturing process, and hence Indian whiskeys are younger compared to the Scottish and Irish whiskeys. According to a study, about 7 of the top selling whiskeys in the world are Indian. Some of them are Mcdowell's No. 1 Reserve, Officer's choice, Director's Special, Royal Stag, Old Tavern, and Imperial Blue.

India has the distinction of being a very large producer of whisky but most Indian distillations called

India whisky are sold as Indian-made foreign liquor, and the reason behind is blending of Indian

brands with 10-12% foreign malts.

The biggest difference comes in the distillation process where the Indian spirits are distilled from

fermented molasses unlike grains in Europe or USA, and thus the Indian spirits do not pass for whisky

there. Since there is virtually no maturation period involved along with no requirement for cereals

among other things, Indian liquor is very cheap to produce.

Whisky, in fact, came to India with the British rule where the first brewery was installed by the British

in Kasauli in Himachal Pradesh, which was then shifted to Solan. The Kasauli brewery was turned

into a distillery, and the reason why grain wasn’t used for fermentation is the sheer shortage of food

and food grain in India.

Most refined spirits that are named as "whiskey" in India are a type of Indian-made remote alcohol, normally mixed in light of nonpartisan spirits that are refined from aged molasses with just a little part comprising of customary malt whiskey, as a rule around 10 to 12 percent.

In terms of volume, India is the biggest consumer of whiskey in the world. It has a complex tax structure with taxes leveled by both Central and State Governments. Import taxes are applied by the Central Government on imported spirits.

Indian Whisky has earned quite a name for itself in the recent past. It is becoming
increasingly popular, especially in the metro cities. The new generation of Indians is
giving this brown liquid preference over wine and rum. Although I am not very much
fond of Indian Whisky, I have tasted it on a quite a few occasions. However, I feel Indian
Whisky doesn’t compete with its counterparts from across the globe; just a personal
opinion, really! But, it is a good start for beginners and you can gradually shift to other
variety of Whiskies including Irish and Canadian eventually.

Indians are not traditionally whiskey drinkers. Whiskey was introduced to Indians by

the Britishers in the 19th century. Unlike the whiskeys around the world, Indian whiskey is usually made

from molasses, which sadly according to EU legislation, is not considered as a whiskey at all. The Indian

tropical climate enhances and speeds up the maturing process, and hence Indian whiskeys are younger

compared to the Scottish and Irish whiskeys. According to a study, about 7 of the top selling whiskeys in

the world are Indian. Some of them are Mcdowell's No. 1 Reserve, Officer's choice, Director's Special,

Royal Stag, Old Tavern, and Imperial Blue

 

India has emerged as the largest international whiskey market toppling the US by volume. Indian

whiskey is an alcoholic beverage that is labeled as "whiskey" in India. Much Indian whiskey is

distilled from fermented molasses, and as such would be considered a sort of rum outside of the

Indian subcontinent. 90% of the "whiskey" consumed in India is molasses based, although India

has begun to distill whiskey from malt and other grains.

 

 

Indian whiskey is produced in the Indian distilleries. Some of my favorite Indian whiskeys are “Amrut

Fusion Single Malt Whisky” and “Paul John” Diageo, which is one of the prime leaders in the market.

India is the world’s fifth largest Scotch whiskey market. The taste of Indian whiskey varies as per the

product and different price ranges. There are a few varieties which you will find only in India which are

very distinct from the other whiskeys produced across the world.