Blended multi-grain spirits, Canadian whiskies are light and smooth. The alcohol consists of a large percentage of corn spirits. Few distillers add a small portion of rye.

Unlike other whiskeys, there is only one law to follow while making Canadian whiskey. Canadians ferment and age each grain separately. Their whiskey must be fermented, distilled and aged in Canada. Alberta Premium, Canadian Club, Canadian Mist, Hurricane, Crown Royal and certain variants of Seagram are the brands to look for while buying Canadian whiskey. When that Canadian gold, sparkling water touches your lips, it creates magic. It lets you enter a whole new world where you can enjoy yourself. It will relieve you from the worries of the world and will give rebellion perspective towards everything. So give it a try for such kind of change.

Unlike other whiskeys, there is only one law to follow while making Canadian whiskey. Canadians ferment and age each grain separately. Their whiskey must be fermented, distilled and aged in Canada. Alberta Premium, Canadian Club, Canadian Mist, Hurricane, Crown Royal and certain variants of Seagram are the brands to look for while buying Canadian whiskey. When that Canadian gold, sparkling water touches your lips, it creates magic. It lets you enter a whole new world where you can enjoy yourself. It will relieve you from the worries of the world and will give rebellion perspective towards everything. So give it a try for such kind of change.

The range of products, of Canadian Whiskies is very broad and includes some of the finest whiskies.Most of the whiskies from Canada are multi grain blended and contain a large percentage of corn spirits in it, which makes it lighter and smoother than other whiskies.Many years ago, the Canadian distillers added “rye” grain to the mash they used in their whiskies which were highly flavored. The Canadian regulations make it very clear that all spirits used in Canadian whiskies must be kept in wooden barrels for at least three years. I personally, like the “rye” flavor in Canadian whiskies.

Although the first ever whiskey created in Canada was made from wheat, thanks to the over-abundance of the grain in the different provinces, the choice of grain quickly shifted to rye.

 

Apparently some of the German and Dutch immigrants weren’t quite feeling the flavor of the common wheat whiskey and decided to add a bit of rye to the mashes. What happened next was the creation of a signature flavor that has become synonymous with Canada and continues to be a big hit with the citizens, neighbors and global whiskey lovers.

 

Canadian whiskies are usually single distillery whiskies. Also, unlike their American counterparts, they do not combine their grains before making the whiskey; each grain type is milled, mashed, fermented, distilled, and matured separately, and only then mingled together as mature whisky.

 

If you want to give this one a peg (pun intended!) do try, Lot No.40, undoubtedly the very best of the best! You would never have tasted the flavors of dried apricot, prunes, oak, nutmeg, clove and star anise coming together like this ever!

 

Another must-sips are Alberta Premium, J.P Wisers legacy and J.P Wisers 18 YO.

 

I keep coming back to Canadian Club Original 1858.......of course you can spend more, but if you're going to enjoy it mixed with Canada Dry Ginger Ale, why bother? This is my go to drink and if you add just a dash of lime juice or lemon juice, you just can't beat this! The taste is superb and for the price I just don't see how you can go wrong. Tastes good, goes down easier than most of the other whiskies in the same range.

Canadian Club is my desert island tipple though and the one I turn to in my many hours of need. The character of Canadian whisky comes from a variety of grains used in the making – Rye, Barley, Wheat, Corn etc. However, off late the taste of Canadian whiskey has become largely dependent on Rye Whiskey where straight rye is used to meet the high American demands. Canada, thus, is also the second highest producer of whisky in the world after Scotland.

 

It is a type of whiskey which produced in Canada. Most of the Canadian whiskey are blended multi grain liquors containing large percentage of corn spirits, and are typically lighter and smoother than other whiskeys. It is recognized as an indigenous product of Canada. It has a distinctive taste and is derived from various cereals: corn, rye, wheat and barley’ with Rye being the most prominent and for years if you asked for a Rye whiskey in North America, you would straightaway be offered Canadian whiskey.

 

Sure, there are other grains used in Canadian whiskeys but over the last few years, distillers have been bottling straight rye to match the demand in America.

 

Canadian whiskey comes in different flavors like Vanilla, honey, caramel, butterscotch, apricot, cherry etc. It is the best-selling whiskey style in North America and it is no surprise that Canada is the second largest whiskey-making nation in the world, next only to Scotland.

Canadian whisky is widely known for its light and smooth taste. However, there are the ones that carry a strong taste as well. Canadian whisky is covered under the Food and Drugs Act in Canada, and it requires that any such whisky that's labeled as ‘Canadian Whisky’, ‘Canadian Rye Whisky’ or ‘Rye Whisky’ should be aged for a minimum period of three years. This mandatory requirement gives Canadian whisky its distinctive taste. Wooden barrels are used to age the whisky and each barrel has a capacity of not more than 700 liters. However, the type of barrels is not defined and manufacturers are free to use new or old barrels or charred or un-charred barrels. Canadian whisky manufacturers are allowed to use certain additives and caramel color to improve the flavor of whisky. 
 

Canadian whiskey, or I wish-key’, as I fondly call it. I clearly remember

the first time that I’d tasted it. It was in Toronto pub where a few of my friends and I were celebrating. These

are best Canadian whiskies out there in the market that you have got to

try at least once in life:

Alberta Premium

J.P Wiser’s 18 YO

Collingwood 21YO rye

Masterson’s 10YO straight rye

Lot No.40

Pike Creek

Whistlepig straight rye

Forty Creek Double Barrel Reserve Canadian Whisky

Crown Royal Single Barrel Whisky

Caribou Crossing Single Barrel Canadian Whisky

Some Famous Brands of Canadian Whiskey:

Lot 40 Canadian Rye Whisky

Forty Creek Barrel Select

Stalk and Barrel Single Malt Whisky

Danfield's Limited Edition 21 Years Old

Highwood Ninety 20

Gibson's Finest Rare

 

One thing common to Canadian whisky consumed in both Canada and US is that the name is used interchangeably with Rye whisky. Most Canadian whiskies are blended multi-grain alcohols with a larger percentage of corn and are lighter in strength compared to whiskies from Europe.

 

Canadian whiskey grew in demand when the Canadian distillers experimented and added a little rye to make the whisky more spicy, and boy did it work. Canada is the second largest producer of commercial whisky in the world. Rye is actually just a small part of the whole mash which is dominated in percentage by corn. It is a very common myth that Straight Rye whiskey is made directly and only with Rye to quench America’s thirst but corn is still the larger constituent of the Canadian Whiskey.

 

Like Scotch, the Canadian whisky also needs to be aged for three years in casks but without the requirement of charred, uncharred, new or used.

Canadian whisky is usually not straight rye whiskey. Unlike the complex rules for making bourbon or Scotch, there is just one law for Canadian whisky distillers to follow: Their whisky must be fermented, distilled and aged in Canada. Period.
Canadians also ferment, distill and age each grain separately. That's it. And just like bourbon, Canadian whiskey is usually made from several different grains. However, unlike bourbon, in Canada each grain is usually fermented, distilled and aged separately. They are only combined together at the very end, this means that the amount of rye whisky added to each blend varies widely.

Canadian Whiskey has a lot of characteristics like scotch or bourbon, but still has features which make it stand out. These unique features are all because of only one ingredient, 'rye.' Rye has so much significance in Canadian whiskeys that people use the term rye whiskeys and Canadian whiskeys interchangeably. For Canadian whiskeys, there is only one law that holds, i.e., the whiskey must be fermented,distilled and aged in Canada. Some of the finest Canadian whiskeys are Lot No. 40, J.P. Wiser's 18 years old, WhistlePig 10-year-old, Forty Creek Confederation Oak Reserve, and Crown Royal Limited Edition

Canada today is the second largest producer of whiskey in the world following right after Scotland,

and this gives Canadian whisky a special place of its own. Most Canadian whiskies are blended multi-

grain spirits with a larger percentage of corn and are lighter, even smoother than other whiskies from

around the world.

It was, however, long ago when Canadian distillers started adding rye to the grains and a distinct

spicy flavour that resulted increased the demand for Canadian whiskey, which was also commonly

referred to as Rye. Today, Rye whiskey and Canadian whiskey are interchangeable terms even when

rye is actually a small percentage of the mash. It is a very common myth that Straight Rye whiskey is

made directly and only with Rye to quench America’s thirst, but corn is still the larger constituent.

Similar to scotch whisky the Canadian whisky also needs to be aged for three years in casks but

without the requirement of charred, uncharred, new or used.

Canadian whiskeys don’t contain any rye grain. Like bourbon, most are primarily corn. Unlike bourbon, Canadian whiskey is made by blending multiple whiskeys after they’ve been aged. That blending process combines two so-called “streams.” The first is a “base whiskey” distilled to a high ABV and typically aged in used barrels. The second includes multiple “flavoring whiskeys,” which are often wheat or rye whiskeys and are distilled to a lower alcohol content and aged in new, or a mix of new and used barrels. With all that said, Century Reserve 21-Year- Old Canadian Rye Whisky happens to be a 100% corn whiskey, which is fairly unusual. It’s bottled at 40% ABV, and retails—in Canada only—for around $35.
 

If you like multi-grain liquors, Canadian Whisky is your ideal choice. It contains corn in
abundance and therefore, is lighter than most whiskies out there. I knew only a thing or
two about Canadian whisky, until last year when I finally had the opportunity to taste it,
and now it has clearly become one of my favourites. Usually I take it neat, although I do
not mind the occasional splash of water to it as well! Fun fact- Canadian Whisky was
very popular in US during the prohibition on liquor and it is in demand even today. You
should definitely try a glass of Whistlepig sometime.

Canadian Whiskey has a lot of characteristics like scotch or bourbon, but still has

features which make it stand out. These unique features are all because of only one ingredient, 'rye.' Rye

has so much significance in Canadian whiskeys that people use the term rye whiskeys and Canadian

whiskeys interchangeably. For Canadian whiskeys, there is only one law that holds, i.e., the whiskey must

be fermented, distilled and aged in Canada. Some of the finest Canadian whiskeys are Lot No. 40, J.P.

Wiser's 18 years old, WhistlePig 10-year- old, Forty Creek Confederation Oak Reserve, and Crown Royal

Limited Edition.

Canadian Whiskey or Rye is produced from a case of cereal grains such as corn, rye, wheat, and

barley. The proportions of each of these grains, per brand, are a major factor in the taste

differences per brand. All rye must be made in Canada and must be aged in oak barrels for a

minimum of 3 years. Some are aged longer than 3 years in charred oak barrels that held bourbon

or brandy previously. Once aging is complete, the barrels are emptied, and the product is filtered

and blended for consistent quality. The age on a bottle of Canadian whiskey is the age of the

youngest whiskey in the blend.

 

Starting from Black Velvet, R & R, and Wiser’s, I have tried this legacy of a whiskey. Being a whiskey

lover, I feel very fortunate to have tried various kinds of whiskeys as it gives different kinds of experiences

due to its quality and taste.

Spirits used in the Canadian whiskey must be aged for three years in wooden barrels that make it so

valuable and distinguished from any other whiskey in the world. That’s the reason I love it the most